Friday, July 3, 2020
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Aurora student will be Nemo’s voice in sequel

A sixth grader at Still Middle School in far west-suburban Aurora, Illinois, has been chosen to provide the voice for Nemo, the lost clown fish of 2003, in the sequel to Pixar’s beloved tale, which will be released next summer, the Naperville Sun reports.


Nemo and Dory in the original (pixar.wikia.com via Creative Commons)

Hayden Rolence, 11, will play Nemo in the sequel, Finding Dory, to be released on June 17, Pixar’s 30th anniversary.

The contents of the movie are, of course, being kept secret, with Pixar officials being able to confirm for the Sun only that Hayden was playing the role. He was selected when he was only 9 years old, so I can only imagine it must have been hard to keep that a secret.

Even Indian Prairie Community Unit School District 204 board President Lori Price said she can’t believe Hayden never let the cat out of the bag.

Other cast members include Ellen DeGeneres as Dory. She’s returning and joined once again by Albert Brooks (Marlin), William DaFoe (Gill), and Vicki Lewis (Deb). New cast members include Ed O’Neill (an octopus named Frank), Ty Burrell (a beluga whale named Bailey), Kaitlin Olson (a whale shark named Destiny), and Diane Keaton (as Dory’s mother Jenny).

Alexander Gould, who voiced Nemo in the 2003 movie, is now 21, a fact that necessitated the casting of Hayden.

The story, which takes place only six months after the events of Finding Nemo, is about Dory’s escape from an ocean sanctuary facility after she is separated from Marlin and Nemo during a quest to find her forgotten family.

“I wanted to know that if this charming forgetful fish ever got lost again, that she would be okay, that she would find her way home,” director Andrew Stanton was quoted as saying on an entertainment blog. “And at the end of Finding Nemo, I wasn’t confident about that. So that’s when I knew I had another story.”

What actor would play you in a movie about your life? Why would you choose that actor?

Paul Katula is the executive editor of the Voxitatis Research Foundation, which publishes this blog. For more information, see the About page.

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