Friday, June 5, 2020
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Some teen health issues linked with screen time

Research has shown that when children watch too much television, their risk of obesity increases. However, more and more screen time is coming from other devices, like tablets and smartphones, and the impact of these devices has not been researched as much.

In a new study scheduled for publication in the Journal of Pediatrics, researchers found that children who reported spending more time on screen devices and watching television engaged in behaviors that can lead to obesity.

Dr Erica L Kenney and Dr Steven L Gortmaker from the Harvard School of Public Health studied data from the 2013 and 2015 waves of the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System, which included 24,800 adolescents in high school. The survey gathered data on the following: hours spent on screen devices (including smartphones, tablets, computers, and videogames) and watching television, hours of sleep on an average school night, number of sugar-sweetened beverages consumed in the previous 7 days, and frequency of physical activity (at least 60 minutes per day) for the past 7 days.

The researchers found that almost 20 percent of US adolescents spent more than five hours a day on smartphones, tablets, computers, and videogames compared with only 8 percent watching more than five hours a day of television.

Watching too much television continued to be associated with obesity and poor diet among adolescents. However, the researchers also found that adolescents who spent more than five hours a day on screen devices were twice as likely to drink a sugary drink each day and not get enough sleep or physical activity, and were about 43 percent more likely to have obesity compared with adolescents who did not spend time on these devices.

Although this study cannot conclude definitively that using screen devices is causing higher rates of obesity, the findings are cause for concern.

According to Dr Kenney, “This study would suggest that limiting children’s and adolescents’ engagement with other screen devices may be as important for health as limiting television time.” Until more research is done, clinicians may want to encourage families to set limits for both television and other screen devices.

Paul Katula is the executive editor of the Voxitatis Research Foundation, which publishes this blog. For more information, see the About page.

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